Titan Store procurement specialist, Barbara Bailey, admires Christina Kent’s “Transformation; Betrayal, Rock Bottom and Trust,” on display in the Lane Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Building 11 art gallery.
Photo: Eugene Johnson
Titan Store procurement specialist, Barbara Bailey, admires Christina Kent’s “Transformation; Betrayal, Rock Bottom and Trust,” on display in the Lane Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Building 11 art gallery.Photo: Eugene Johnson

Titan Store procurement specialist, Barbara Bailey, admires Christina Kent’s “Transformation; Betrayal, Rock Bottom and Trust,” on display in the Lane Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Building 11 art gallery.
Photo: Eugene Johnson

Art exploring the cosmos, sexual equality and fresh graphic design will be included in an all-student show running through March 13 in the Building 11 art gallery.

The exhibit features art in several mediums, all created by Lane students. Five pieces were nominated by selected jurors to represent Lane on the national level for League of Innovations.

Lane art student Anna Petrick, a first-time contributor to the exhibit, was one of five chosen to continue on to the League of Innovations competition. She submitted a large piece titled “Sticks and Stones.” This large structure consists of a fully built wall, complete with outlets and exposed wall studs in which Petrick engraved phrases and quotes.

“Sticks and Stones” focuses on sexual equality. Engraved in the wall studs are phrases like “you should be ashamed,” and “but you’re so pretty,” in response to what some may say when an individual is open about their sexuality. Due to the size of this piece, it is on display in the Building 10 gallery.

Petrick claimed that she was not surprised she had been nominated for the competition and would like to use her work as a form of activism for sexuality and gender issues.

“I knew going in that I had a strong, unique piece,” she wrote. “I’m inspired to create art when I have an idea that just can’t be articulated in any other way.”

Lane performing-arts marketing specialist John Watson was one of three jurors for the League of Innovations. Beverly Soasey, the director of the Jacobs Gallery, juried the student exhibit. Of the artwork chosen by Soasey, five pieces were selected for the League.

Watson said jurors asked four questions when judging work: “Did the student have something to say? How well did they say it? Then, how complete was the project? Did we think it had been fully developed?”

Watson talked about the challenges of picking from such a diverse and unique body of student work.

Lane student Erin Wood is also new to the competition. She submitted “Star Quest,” a star trail photo shot over Spores Bridge in Eugene. Her art was selected as part of the Student Exhibition, but she was not chosen as a League representative.

“My main challenge is learning to put my passion out for others to judge (and) critique. One never knows if one’s artwork will be liked or disliked as art is so subjective to each individual,” Wood wrote. “What I have learned is to put out what I like and hope that others see the beauty in it.”

Both of these students spoke of the help and encouragement they received from their instructors.

“All of my teachers at Lane have been extremely supportive. Lee Imonen, Kate Ali and Andy Salzman, in particular, have given me a great amount of encouragement through this whole process,” Petrick wrote.

Erin Wood advises students who wish to submit to the competition in the future not to second-guess themselves.

“Art is an extension of you and needs to be seen,” Wood wrote. “When it comes to presentation, seek advice, ask questions. I have learned that other artists are more than happy to help with advice and presentation. After all, everyone is a ‘newbie’ at some point.”

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