Faculty showcase art: practicing what they teach

Faculty showcase art: practicing what they teach

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Media Arts instructor Susie Morrill discusses her digital image pieces at the Faculty Art Gallery Reception on Wednesday, Oct 15.
Photo by: August Frank
Media Arts instructor Susie Morrill discusses her digital image pieces at the Faculty Art Gallery Reception on Wednesday, Oct 15.Photo by: August Frank

Media Arts instructor Susie Morrill discusses her digital image pieces at the Faculty Art Gallery Reception on Wednesday, Oct 15.
Photo by: August Frank


The Art and Applied Design staff is giving the community a chance to view their own creative pieces, their exhibition opened in the LCC Gallery in Building 11 on Wednesday, Oct. 15 and is open through Oct. 23.

Media Arts instructor Susie Morrill described her collection of photographs taken around Havana, Cuba in January 2013, “The place is frozen in time. It’s unbelievable. It’s so beautiful. The people are so wonderful and genuine,“ Morrill said. “They don’t have a lot of technology. They don’t have the Internet, they don’t have movies, they don’t have cell phones.”

The exhibit features art created by art faculty. Paintings, photographs and ceramics are on display in two rooms.

Morrill described how she aimed to depict the flavor of Cuba’s culture, with its combined Spanish and Russian influences. One image displayed a young Russian girl posing before getting married on New Year Day’s. Another portrayed the boarded-up capitol building flanked by broken down classic-style cars.

She then explained the image of a grandmother with her granddaughter and the sense of authenticity she felt from them. “People play dominoes in the streets… the community’s just so much tighter-knit than what we’re used to,” Morrill said.

Another piece, entitled “The Fire,” created by Media Arts instructor Jan Halvorsen, presented four separate paintings of a girl looking into the distance to her right and then turning back to her left.

“It’s kind of a convergence of what I do, since I teach narrative and storyboards,” Halvorsen said, “I just started wanting to bring that way of representing time and story into a static piece like a painting.”

Halvorsen explained why it was laid out in separate frames, as if she shot it in action. It was displayed in a way as if viewed through a camera lens that started at one end and followed her as she moved.  The title came to her as she was painting. She had no real sense of what the girl was looking at, at first, because she was focusing more on her reaction.

“I think I was influenced by all the forest fires this summer,” Halvorsen said. She liked the idea of portraying a surface that was also a story, allowing people to see both 3D and 2D at the same time.

The faculty exhibition, in the LCC Gallery, runs through Oct. 24th.

 

 

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