Left to Right: Sarah Anderson business major, Michael Marin English Lit. Major, and Dan Leman Computer network operations major make use of the smoking hut in parking lot L on Thursday, Oct. 9.Photo by: August Frank

Left to Right: Sarah Anderson business major, Michael Marin English Lit. Major, and Dan Leman Computer network operations major make use of the smoking hut in parking lot L on Thursday, Oct. 9.
 Photo by: August Frank

Ella Jones
Reporter


Lane Community College’s smoking huts might be moved to the perimeter of campus or could be removed altogether. These were two of the options presented for discussion at the Board of Education meeting on July 9 concerning smoking at Lane.

Several of the concerns raised at the board meeting were:

• The fact that the existence of the smoking huts contradicts the college’s claim that Lane is a tobacco free campus.

• If students are prevented from smoking altogether, it could cause them undue stress.

• Not being permitted to smoke might support some students in their attempts to quit.

• Some people might not enroll at Lane if smoking were completely disallowed.

• A total ban would put additional strain on public safety. Who would be in charge of enforcement?

In response to the diverse options aired in the discussion, Lane President Mary Spilde called for a robust campus discussion on the matter.

All other Lane campuses are 100 percent smoke-free. The main campus is the only exception.

In 2012, the University of Oregon became a completely smoke-free campus. The university began offering cessation support programs two years before eliminating smoking in order to help staff and students adapt to the change.

Smoking is allowed in cars with the windows rolled up. However, smokers are advised to leave campus to smoke. Violations can result in a $30 fine. Many smokers at UO have resorted to standing in front of the main campus gate or on a median in the middle of Agate street. Both of which have caused littering and safety issues.

“Tobacco use is the number one preventable killer of Oregonians and is responsible for 25 percent of deaths in the state,” Dr. Patrick F. Luedtke wrote in an article on the UofO website titled “UO Becomes a smoke and tobacco free university
Sept. 1.”

 

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