Computer club draws crowd; coding industry finds new home for future programmers

Computer club draws crowd; coding industry finds new home for future programmers

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Joanna Goode, University of Oregon faculty member, addresses the need for computer sciences education at Digital Dojo event at Lane downtown campus.
Photo by: Amanda Irvin
Joanna Goode, University of Oregon faculty member, addresses the need for computer sciences education at Digital Dojo event at Lane downtown campus.Photo by: Amanda Irvin

Joanna Goode, University of Oregon faculty member, addresses the need for computer sciences education at Digital Dojo event at Lane downtown campus.
Photo by: Amanda Irvin

Amanda Irvin
Reporter


The Digital Dojo is a new computer club open to the public ­— a place where kids and teens can go to learn coding. It’s a free, safe, social environment located at Lane’s downtown campus.

Community volunteers give their time to teach kids and even adults how to code and program computers, using various programming languages such as Python, Ruby and C#. They also use Scratch and Alice 3, which are 3D game and animation engines for making your own video games.

One of the purposes of the Digital Dojo is to get more people interested in computer science. Eugene and Springfield have become known locally as a Silicon Shire because of the pool of technology that is currently available and supported.

Organizers expect computer industry job growth in Eugene and Springfield in the coming years, however, there are currently not enough people who could fill these positions. The premise of Digital Dojo is “that if we build it, they will come,” so that Eugene-Springfield will grow their own “techies” for the future.

The Digital Dojo is always looking for volunteers.

 

 

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