Students provided with tools to craft success; Administration helps students reach their...

Students provided with tools to craft success; Administration helps students reach their goals

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With a focus in product design, art major Jina Choi smooths the side of the vase she’s creating in a ceramics hand building class.
Photo: August Frank
With a focus in product design, art major Jina Choi smooths the side of the vase she’s creating in a ceramics hand building class.Photo: August Frank

With a focus in product design, art major Jina Choi smooths the side of the vase she’s creating in a ceramics hand building class.
Photo: August Frank

As many students struggle during Spring term with the more difficult, time consuming capstone classes, administrators point to helpful strategies. Director of student success Lida Herburger said “to us it [student success] is helping students reach their goals whatever those goals may be.”

Herburger said this is done by implementing well-researched outcome-based high impact practices which have proven records of aiding students in reaching their goals. Institutional research studies and surveys given at community colleges nationwide produce statistically sound benchmarks.

“High impact practices could be seven thousand things, but we utilize the ones from the Community College Survey of Student Engagement and from the Association of American Colleges and Universities,” she said. “When we created the Titan Tips, all of those come from HIPs because we all know those are things that help students succeed.”

Rachael Wilkerson is completing her first year as a medical office assistant. She defines student success as “getting good grades, getting a good GPA and succeeding in the major you want to go into.” She said the tools she uses are “motivation — definitely, study sessions, concentration for sure and hard work.” Wilkerson said that what motivates her is “knowing that I’m working towards my life goal.”

Gerry Meenaghan, Honors Program Experiential Learning coordinator and International Work Experience advisor agrees that the 10 Titan Tips for student success are key.

“These tips may seem very simple at first glance, but it is amazing to me that some of them are disregarded. Some of that has to do with the fact that our students tend to be very busy and overcommitted with a combination of college coursework, part or full-time work, and family and personal obligations,” Meenaghan said.

The fact that Lane is a commuter college can make it easier for students to miss out on the richer experiences that help with success, Herburger said. “If a teacher knows your name, it helps with student engagement,” she said. “Attending class is a high-impact practice.”

Herburger emphasized that it’s the student’s role to set goals and decide what success will look like for them. “The core learning outcomes, they’re all based on HIPs and also what employers believe people need to be successful in the workforce,” Herburger said. They are defined as:

  • The ability to think critically
  • Engage diverse values with civic
    and ethical awareness
  • Create ideas and solutions
  • Communicate effectively
  • Apply learning

Herburger said that reviewing and preparing before placement tests can help students be more successful and place in higher level classes, commenting that said students sometimes fail to prepare and review before math placement tests. She said that it is essential to understand the basics before building more complex concepts.

Second year nursing major Tracy Nyseth said that good grades and GPA are how she defines success. She uses a variety of tools to achieve those goals. “For anatomy and physiology class I usually draw pictures and that really helps a lot,” she said, adding that having scheduled time to study is critical. “I allot two hours of study for each class per day, because you do most of your learning outside of school,” she said.

Meenaghan stresses the importance of putting in regular and consistent effort into career and job searches. She said that there are many steps students can take, while still in college, to become more prepared for entering the job market.

Meenaghan recommends starting early. “For students just starting out at Lane or just finishing the first year of a two-year program, time is on your side,” she said.

Lane’s soon-to-be-integrated Career & Employment Services unit, Cooperative Education Division and the Lane Workforce Partnerships office will be housed in Building 19. This union will provide an integration of career and employment services with internships and job opportunities available to students.

THE 10 TITAN TIPS

1. See your advising team

2. Go to class

3. Plan your time wisely

4. Do homework promptly

5. Start a study group

6. Ask questions

7. Use tutoring

8. Meet with instructors

9. Make a plan

10. Get involved

Fine arts major Matt Lehmann practices drawing the corner of a building in his Art 131, Intro to Drawing class on the grass outside Building 6.Photo: August Frank

Fine arts major Matt Lehmann practices drawing the corner of a building in his Art 131, Intro to Drawing class on the grass outside Building 6.
Photo: August Frank
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