With temperatures rapidly dropping, Lane opens up an Egan Warming Center so that people like Tony McNellis can get food, watch a movie and have a warm place to sleep in Building 4, Room 104 on Nov. 25, 2015.
With temperatures rapidly dropping, Lane opens up an Egan Warming Center so that people like Tony McNellis can get food, watch a movie and have a warm place to sleep in Building 4, Room 104 on Nov. 25, 2015.
With temperatures rapidly dropping, Lane opens up an Egan Warming Center so that people like Tony McNellis can get food, watch a movie and have a warm place to sleep in Building 4, Room 104 on Nov. 25, 2015.
Campus shelter provides relief from freezing nights

 

Every time the weather forecast is predicted to be below 30 degrees the warming center will open from 7 p.m. to 8 a.m. Warming center volunteers will then provide various amenities such as food, a hot shower, and access to blankets and mats.

The warming center will be catered with break- fast and dinner donated by the culinary program on campus.

“We have a variety of food, generally sandwiches and soups. If the school is open, then we give them a voucher to come in and get food from the food service [on campus],” Chef Clive Wanstall said. “It’s just the right thing to do.”

The warming center was first piloted last winter called an ‘activation,’ which is what all warming centers under the Egan Warming Center are called when first opened. Public Safety seeks to help the student community by providing a warm and safe refuge from the predicted freezing temperatures this winter.

“We are here for the community,” Jace Smith, Public Safety Chief said. “There are students and non-students that camp in the woods, that are living in their cars and sometimes it’s a matter of

embarrassment. [People] don’t want to say something.” Although open to anyone in the area who is in need of a warm shelter, the warming center was

organized specifically for homeless Lane students. “It’s good to help the next person, even if we don’t know them. They’re somebody’s child,” Amanda Ervin, ethnic studies major said. “When I moved to this country [from Mexico] when I was 17, I was homeless with my mom so it was helpful to have

people who didn’t know me be very giving.” Despite the outpouring of support from the college community, organizers are worried that a lack of attendance or awareness from people who need to use this space will ultimately lead to the permanent

cancellation of the center.
The best way community members and students

can provide support for the warming center is by spreading the word and letting people who might need shelter know.

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