Members of Eugene march against hate

Hundreds gather in response to the events in Charlottesville, Va

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An estimated 1,500 members of the community gathered at the Erb Memorial Union Amphitheater at the University of Oregon campus on Aug. 14 in a a national response to march against racism and bigotry after the events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
On Aug. 14, an estimated 1,500 members of the community gathered at the Erb Memorial Union Amphitheater at the University of Oregon campus in response to the tragic events that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia. The crowd was instructed by speaker Charlie Landeros to hold their fist in the air and yell “I am a revolutionary!”
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
In the front of the march, who walked through E. 13th street on their way to the Lane County Courthouse, two members hold a sign for the United Front Families for Resistance and Non-violent Organization.
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Lupe Martina, one of the organizers of the Hate is Not Welcome in Lane County March, feeds participants chants to yell as they walked through downtown Eugene on Aug. 14.
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Anthony Palmer (wearing his Captain America costume) was one of the many members of the Eugene community who decided to participate in the Hate is Not Welcome in Lane County March which was held on Aug. 14.
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Among the many marchers who participated in the Hate is Not Welcome in Lane County event, Seela Sankei walks with the crowd holding a sign with a quote about racial unity from the prophet Muhammad
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Hundreds gathered across the street of the Lane County Courthouse after the march to listen to speakers talk about what the crowd needed to do to take action against discrimination in the Eugene/Springfield community.
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Charlie Landeros, one of the organizers of the Hate is Not Welcome in Lane County event, brought community member Davis Armstrong in front of the crowd. Armstrong was the victim of a hate crime after someone sprayed painted a racial slur on his property just a week prior to the march. Armstrong gave a short speech in which he said, “I am a man. Not an N-Word.” He ended his speech by loosely quoting Martin Luther King Jr., “Judge me by the character of my content, not by the color of my skin.”
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Fama Gedi smiles as she introduced herself to the crowd that gathered across the street from the Lane County Courthouse after the “Hate is Not Welcome in Lane County” march on Aug. 14. Gedi, a student at the University of Oregon and President of the Muslim Student Association, talked about being the subject of discrimination for “wearing a hijab, for being a Muslim, for being a woman and being a person of color.”
Hunter Ruland / The Torch
Kris Ray, a local poet, spoke to the crowd who gathered across the street of the Lane County Courthouse saying, “To be black and feminine in the United States means that I cannot afford to have the time or the leisure to stay shook by the ugly things white people and white supremacists try to inflict upon my black body.” Earlier, she remarked that she was impressed by the white members of the crowd saying that she “Wasn’t expecting much,” and that she felt that the audience wasn’t ready to put in the work to fight against discrimination. One audience member shouted, “We’re ready!” “Alright, prove me wrong,” was Ray’s response.
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