Category Archives: Features

Students provided with tools to craft success; Administration helps students reach their goals

With a focus in product design, art major Jina Choi smooths the side of the vase she’s creating in a ceramics hand building class.Photo: August Frank

With a focus in product design, art major Jina Choi smooths the side of the vase she’s creating in a ceramics hand building class.
Photo: August Frank

As many students struggle during Spring term with the more difficult, time consuming capstone classes, administrators point to helpful strategies. Director of student success Lida Herburger said “to us it [student success] is helping students reach their goals whatever those goals may be.”

Herburger said this is done by implementing well-researched outcome-based high impact practices which have proven records of aiding students in reaching their goals. Institutional research studies and surveys given at community colleges nationwide produce statistically sound benchmarks.

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Center building reunion; Part One

Lane student Tiya Craven in the arms of her mother Naomi Duncan Ason next to her brother. This is an archive photograph Craven sent to her mother that led to their reunion.Photo: supplied by Tiya Craven

Lane student Tiya Craven in the arms of her mother Naomi Duncan Ason next to her brother. This is an archive photograph Craven sent to her mother that led to their reunion.
Photo: supplied by Tiya Craven

My first year at Lane Community College in 1999 was amazing. However, the first day of my second year was life-changing.

I was about 20 people deep in a line back when Financial Aid was upstairs in the Center Building. A woman walked up to me and asked if she could help me. I knew this woman. I looked down at her name-tag just to be sure, then back up at her face. Yes I knew her. She, however, was looking at a stranger and waiting for a reply.

“Uhh … Uhhh,” I stammered. “I forgot something.” Turning to my friend I said “Come on Cari, we have to go now.” I felt like I had just been hit in the gut as I ran down the stairs of the Center Building. Cari stopped me and asked what was wrong. I looked up at her and said, “Cari, that was my Mom.”

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Extreme makeover forging ahead; Navigation maps soon irrelevant

Construction workers Lucas Martin (left) and Nitai Stein continue work on the west side of the Center Building which will be renamed CLASS upon completion.Photo: August Frank

Construction workers Lucas Martin (left) and Nitai Stein continue work on the west side of the Center Building which will be renamed CLASS upon completion.
Photo: August Frank

It’s news to no one that Lane’s Center Building is undergoing reconstruction. Who can miss the giant pieces of machinery, barricades, walkway labyrinths and noise dominating the LCC landscape? Construction workers too are as much a part of the Lane community these days as staff, teachers and students.

It may be hard to imagine what it will be like when construction is complete. If work stays on schedule, fall term will see the unveiling and fruits of all the planning, construction and disruption. Being able to get from point A to point B with ease once again is sure to be one of the most welcome experiences for the campus community.

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Expo sparks interest

Mikel Stone practices wire drive welding at the 2015 LCC Fabrications and Welding Expo. Lane students, prospective students, friends, family and other community members attended the event at LCC main campus. Attendees had the opportunity to learn about the profession, meet and talk with fabrication and welding companies and learn to fabricate and weld their own projects. Current Lane fabrication and welding students were on hand to teach and assist people with the creation of their projects. Over 11 local manufacturers, suppliers and businesses were representedPhoto: August Frank

Mikel Stone practices wire drive welding at the 2015 LCC Fabrications and Welding Expo. Lane students, prospective students, friends, family and other community members attended the event at LCC main campus. Attendees had the opportunity to learn about the profession, meet and talk with fabrication and welding companies and learn to fabricate and weld their own projects. Current Lane fabrication and welding students were on hand to teach and assist people with the creation of their projects. Over 11 local manufacturers, suppliers and businesses were represented
Photo: August Frank
Photo: August Frank
Photo: August Frank

Spring Bash helps relief effort

The Asian & Pacific Islander Student Union held the “Spring Bash” at the Center for Meeting and Learning. Attendees were entertained by music and dance. Kumm Iwalani (pictured above) of “Sweet Aloha” provided the music. Dance was performed by “Island Arts” with other members of the APISU dance team. All proceeds went to “Action Against Hunger” to support relief efforts in Nepal.Photo: August Frank

The Asian & Pacific Islander Student Union held the “Spring Bash” at the Center for Meeting and Learning. Attendees were entertained by music and dance. Kumm Iwalani (pictured above) of “Sweet Aloha” provided the music. Dance was performed by “Island Arts” with other members of the APISU dance team. All proceeds went to “Action Against Hunger” to support relief efforts in Nepal.
Photo: August Frank

What it means to be a boy; Mime explores silence surrounding gender matters

Bill Bowers works as a professional mime. He will be coming to LCC from May 27 to May 30 and will be taking part in a Q & A, a workshop and a performance.Photo: contributed by Bill Bowers

Bill Bowers works as a professional mime. He will be coming to LCC from May 27 to May 30 and will be taking part in a Q & A, a workshop and a performance.
Photo: contributed by Bill Bowers

Employing a mixture of mime, music, and monologues, Broadway actor and mime Bill Bowers participates in an ongoing investigation of the silence surrounding matters of gender in today’s culture. He draws his characters from life and explores how men are socialized into modern culture from boyhood.
Lane’s Student Production Association is presenting several opportunities for Lane students and community members to experience his work.
Bowers says that this investigation began shortly after his mother died. While going through her possessions he discovered a poem titled “What is a boy?” He learned from his sisters that his mother brought the poem home with her when he was born.
He carried the poem with him for years while entertaining questions about what it means to be a boy or a man. He then had a son and this inquiry deepened.
Bowers lives with his husband and two lesbian women. While using colored pencils, his son commented that the pink pencil is the color for girls. Bowers and his family have no contractual agreements regarding what his son will be exposed to. However, they are very conscious about how they are raising him. The boy does not watch television and didn’t learn to associate pink with girls at home. Bowers said that gender socialization runs deeper than we realize.
Visual storytelling through mime is a way to reach people emotionally, Bowers said. It’s not just about humor. He said that when he’s on stage, he remains aware of the audience and that people are following him. If he senses that they aren’t, he makes sure he is being clear in what he is conveying.
Finding Marcel Marceau
Bowers’ mother took him to see Marcel Marceau when he was 17 years old. Years later, when he learned that Marceau was touring to celebrate his 80th birthday, Bowers sought him out and became his student. Marceau died one year later.
Audiences, particularly in America, have a limited and even negative perspective on mime, according to Bowers. People fear that they won’t understand it or enjoy it, he said. He incorporates other art forms, using some music and speech and finds that audiences appreciate and enjoy the different elements that he brings to the mime art form.
“I try to make my stories very accessible and personable, and through that, universal,” Bowers said. People comment that they do understand it and are unexpectedly moved and entertained.
“I’ve never been busier and I take that as a good sign,” he said. “I feel like I’m in the right place doing exactly what I want to do.”
Mime isn’t just about humor. It can evoke strong emotions in people. “One of the strengths of the mime art form is that it allows the audience to participate in terms of the imaginary world and it invites the audience to feel,” Bowers added. “It invites people to participate in the story, and I think that’s what opens people up.”
Acclaim for Bowers’ one-man show:
New York Times: “Fascinating. Affecting. Engaging to the eye and ear.”
Dallas Arts Examiner: “Beyond Words” is one of the most poignant, fresh, absorbing, empathic, hilarious, and ingenious pieces I’ve ever seen. Bowers transforms the stage into a realm of revelation and transfiguring.”
New York Post: “He presents a portrait of small-town America filtered through his own experiences that’s both moving and funny. Bowers effortlessly brings us to laughter and tears, often at the same time.”
Blue Door Theatre:
Free and open to the public:
“Movement for the actor” workshop Wednesday, May 27 – 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Dress to move.
Q&A session: Thursday, May 28 from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Reserve space: Brian Haimbach: haimbachb@lanecc.edu.
Ragozzino Performance Hall:
One man show “Beyond Words:” Saturday, May 30 at 7:00 p.m.
Tickets: Students and seniors $10.00
General admission $20.00
High school students free.
Purchase: lanecc.edu/tickets or 541-463-5648 or pay at the door.
SPA is offering a “pay what you can” at the door for anyone who would like to attend.
Information about Bowers and the show can be found at: www.Bill-Bowers.com

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Students shape art with power tools

Second year Human Services student Jeffrey Banker cuts away at his marble sculpture in Lee Imomen’s stone sculpting class in Building 10.Photo: Justin Cox

Second year Human Services student Jeffrey Banker cuts away at his marble sculpture in Lee Imomen’s stone sculpting class in Building 10.
Photo: Justin Cox

Forklifts, giant pieces of stone, clouds of dust and the noise of power tools might cause passers by to mistake Lee Imonen’s stone sculpting class for a construction site. However, through the dust and debris is a challenging and fascinating class, which has been held at Lane for the past 14 years.

The class allows students to experience the entire process of creating a stone sculpture from scratch. Included is everything from forging original hand tools to presenting the final project in the gallery.

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Compassion’s in fashion; The Dalai Lama’s translator speaks at Lane

Dr. Geshe Thupten Jinpa Langri drinks tea with Lane Peace Center Chair Stan Taylor and others in the Blue Door Theatre before speaking to over 500 people in the Ragozzino Performance Hall on Sunday, May 10.Photo: Justin Cox

Dr. Geshe Thupten Jinpa Langri drinks tea with Lane Peace Center Chair Stan Taylor and guests in the Blue Door Theatre before speaking to over 500 people in the Ragozzino Performance Hall on Sunday, May 10.
Photo: Justin Cox

It was standing room only as more than 500 people filled Lane’s Ragozzino Performance Hall on May 10, but it was quiet enough to hear a pin drop. The speaker, Geshe Thupten Jinpa Langri, started his presentation by leading the audience through a brief, silent meditative breathing exercise.

The presentation was about his new book, “Fearless Heart,” which focuses on the power of compassion. Jinpa said he feels that this book is especially important, because it is the first he has written for the general public, rather than for Buddhists or academics.

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Dalai Lama translator speaks on compassion

The Lane Community College Peace Center and the Palmo Center for Peace and Education are hosting a talk by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Ph.D., the longtime English translator for the Dalai Lama. The talk is titled “Fearlessness and Compassion: Cultivating the Courage to Transform Our Lives and Our World.”

Jinpa’s work furthers people’s understanding of the power of compassion for others and for their own well-being. He will address questions such as: Can compassion be cultivated? Can compassion lead to being taken advantage of, or compromising our ambitions?

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Accessibility for all; Disability exhibit comes to Lane

The exhibit on disability in Building 10 was created by Alaska’s Department of Health and Social Services, and shows the history of disability through the ages.Photo: August Frank

The exhibit on disability in Building 10 was created by Alaska’s Department of Health and Social Services, and shows the history of disability through the ages.
Photo: August Frank

On May 4, The Center for Accessibility Resources, formerly known as Disability Resources, hosted a reception for an exhibit on the history of disability.

The exhibit, created by Alaska’s Department of Health and Social Services, shows the history of disability through the ages. Beginning with ancient times, the panels of the exhibit portray the varying moral, medical and social viewpoints on disability, replete with commentary, images and famous quotes.

Early Greek and Roman philosophers, quoted in the first panel, viewed bodily perfection as a human ideal. As proponents of infanticide for those born with any visible defect, they stand in stark contrast to modern viewpoints. The exhibit explores everything from the words of Jesus and the impact of religion on disabled people, to eugenics and Nazi experiments during World War II.

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